Anna  worked very closely with  The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust (QEDJT) on their landmark photography project Time to See.  Time To See highlights the work of QEDJT, Standard Chartered’s Seeing is Believing initiative and their partners on reducing avoidable blindness for the 98 million people in the Commonwealth who are blind or have low vision. Time to See was created for advocacy and educational purposes to show the simple solutions available for 80% of those across the Commonwealth with avoidable blindness. The Time to See exhibition was presented to Her Majesty The Queen at a private viewing at St James’s Palace, London in October 2016. It was then shown at three different venues during the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Malta which was attended by The Queen and all Heads of the 53 Commonwealth Governments.

Anna liaised with QEDJT, their partners, five award-winning photojournalists and the curator Cheryl Newman, to ensure powerful images were captured to help tell the story of QEDJT’s work.  Anna helped QEDJT produce the exhibitions for St James’s Palacethe Commonwealth Health Ministers Meeting in Geneva and the three concurrent exhibitions at CHOGM in Malta.  Time to See has also been exhibited at various private events including Australia House, London, the Houses of Parliament, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and Standard Charted Bank, London. It was exhibited publicly for the first time at London Bridge City Pier for two weeks in April 2018.

The award-winning photojournalists Ashley Gilbertson, Poulomi Basu, Sam Faulkner, Andrew Quilty, and Adam Ferguson,  travelled to India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Australia and Fiji to capture the inspiring work of QEDJT and their partners.  www.timetosee.org

Subamma With Her 5-year-old Daughter Nagamani, Waiting To Go Into The Rehabilitation Room In L.V Prasad Eye Institute. Nagamani Lifts Her Arms To Reach For The Light In The Room. She Was Born Prematurely And Developed Retinopathy Of Prematurity Which Has Left Her With Only Partial Vision.
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Subamma with her 5-year-old daughter Nagamani, waiting to go into the rehabilitation room in L.V Prasad Eye Institute. Nagamani lifts her arms to reach for the light in the room. She was born prematurely and developed retinopathy of prematurity which has left her with only partial vision.

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Treating Diabetic Retinopathy In Pakistan

Lahore, Pakistan. September 9, 2015 - A nurse in training consults with a doctor and patient in the Refraction Room of the Ophthalmology Department at Mayo Hospital. Prior to this point in the treatment process, patients were initially pin-pointed for referral by Lady Health Workers who have a network across the city and who are responsible for as many as 1,000 people from their local community. Nearly ten percent of the population of Pakistan is diabetic and therefore many are referred to the hospitals Diabetic Unit. From there, patients who appear to be suffering from vision impairment as a result of their diabetes are referred on to the Ophthalmology Department where further testing for Diabetic Retinopathy can be performed and treated, if necessary. (Photo: Andrew Quilty / Oculi for The Queens Jubilee Trust).

Sight Savers In Kenya

Nyukong Galwak, 30, a South Sudanese refugee, prepares to go home after an operation to correct Trachoma Trichiasis at a Sight Savers program held at Kakuma Mission Hospital, in Turkana West County, Kenya, on June 30, 2015. The patient is Nyat Gai, a sixty year old male. Sight Savers is a British NGO that is diagnosing, curing, and preventing various eye conditions, including Trachoma, which has the highest incident rates Kenya in Turkana County. (Photo by Ashley Gilbertson / VII Photo)

Treating Diabetic Retinopathy In Pakistan

Lahore, Pakistan. September 7, 2015 - In the Diabetes Unit inside the main Outpatient Department (OPD) of Mayo Hospital, several doctors see diabetic patients who have been referred to them by a network of Lady Health Workers that work across the city and who see up to 1,000 people in their local area per month. From this room, diabetes sufferers with eye problems are referred across the hallway to an Investigative Oculist who looks for retina damage as a result of diabetes. If retina damage is present, patients are then referred to the Ophthalmology Department for further tests and treatment, if necessary. (Photo: Andrew Quilty / Oculi for The Queens Jubilee Trust).

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Jonathan Dau-Otema (purple sweater), 10, being prescribed glasses by Ophthalmic Clinical Officer Ruth Kaggwa (black jacket, red dress, hair in bun); her assistant Nansereko Dianah (red dress, ponytail, rhinestone earrings), 24; Dr. Naomi Nsabaya (striped shirt, glasses), 51, Sub Regional Manager of the Brien Holden Vision Initiative, and Clinical Officer Baker Mukiibi (male, purple shirt, sitting on slit lamp), 27, at the Wakiso District Eye Center on the outskirts of Kampala, Uganda on July 8, 2015. Children who fail eye tests at district schools are referred to district eye centers, like this one, where clinical officers examine the child's vision more thoroughly. A child may receive medication, glasses, a low vision device, or may be referred to a national hospital. The Brien Holden Vision Initiative works within the Seeing is Believing program at this level and at the school level to provide training to clinical staff and teachers, equipment needs and the building of systems between the ministries of health and education. (Photo by Ashley Gilbertson / VII Photo)

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Community children draw and play at the Youth Shed on Yalata Community in South Australia, Australia on Oct. 6, 2015. Children engage in sport and recreation activities provided at the Youth Centre during school holidays at the Yalata community in remote western South Australia. The Safe Eyes, Healthy Lives program at Yalata is being developed to enable active collaboration between the community and the health service, the school, the council, the youth centre and other relevant agencies in order to address the key issues of facial hygiene and environmental health in the context of eliminating trachoma and other communicable disease. Photo by Adam Ferguson for The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust

Subamma With Her 5-year-old Daughter Nagamani, Waiting To Go Into The Rehabilitation Room In L.V Prasad Eye Institute. Nagamani Lifts Her Arms To Reach For The Light In The Room. She Was Born Prematurely And Developed Retinopathy Of Prematurity Which Has Left Her With Only Partial Vision.Nigeria SFA 150922 1155Lahore, Pakistan. September 9, 2015 - A Nurse In Training Consults With A Doctor And Patient In The Refraction Room Of The Ophthalmology Department At Mayo Hospital. Prior To This Point In The Treatment Process, Patients Were Initially Pin-pointed For Referral By Lady Health Workers Who Have A Network Across The City And Who Are Responsible For As Many As 1,000 People From Their Local Community. Nearly Ten Percent Of The Population Of Pakistan Is Diabetic And Therefore Many Are Referred To The Hospitals Diabetic Unit. From There, Patients Who Appear To Be Suffering From Vision Impairment As A Result Of Their Diabetes Are Referred On To The Ophthalmology Department Where Further Testing For Diabetic Retinopathy Can Be Performed And Treated, If Necessary. (Photo: Andrew Quilty / Oculi For The Queens Jubilee Trust).Nyukong Galwak, 30, A South Sudanese Refugee, Prepares To Go Home After An Operation To Correct Trachoma Trichiasis At A Sight Savers Program Held At Kakuma Mission Hospital, In Turkana West County, Kenya, On June 30, 2015. The Patient Is Nyat Gai, A Sixty Year Old Male. Sight Savers Is A British NGO That Is Diagnosing, Curing, And Preventing Various Eye Conditions, Including Trachoma, Which Has The Highest Incident Rates Kenya In Turkana County.  (Photo By Ashley Gilbertson / VII Photo)Lahore, Pakistan. September 7, 2015 - In The Diabetes Unit Inside The Main Outpatient Department (OPD) Of Mayo Hospital, Several Doctors See Diabetic Patients Who Have Been Referred To Them By A Network Of Lady Health Workers That Work Across The City And Who See Up To 1,000 People In Their Local Area Per Month. From This Room, Diabetes Sufferers With Eye Problems Are Referred Across The Hallway To An Investigative Oculist Who Looks For Retina Damage As A Result Of Diabetes. If Retina Damage Is Present, Patients Are Then Referred To The Ophthalmology Department For Further Tests And Treatment, If Necessary. (Photo: Andrew Quilty / Oculi For The Queens Jubilee Trust).Jonathan Dau-Otema (purple Sweater), 10, Being Prescribed Glasses By Ophthalmic Clinical Officer Ruth Kaggwa (black Jacket, Red Dress, Hair In Bun); Her Assistant Nansereko Dianah (red Dress, Ponytail, Rhinestone Earrings), 24; Dr. Naomi Nsabaya (striped Shirt, Glasses), 51, Sub Regional Manager Of The Brien Holden Vision Initiative, And Clinical Officer Baker Mukiibi (male, Purple Shirt, Sitting On Slit Lamp), 27, At The Wakiso District Eye Center On The Outskirts Of Kampala, Uganda On July 8, 2015. Children Who Fail Eye Tests At District Schools Are Referred To District Eye Centers, Like This One, Where Clinical Officers Examine The Child's Vision More Thoroughly. A Child May Receive Medication, Glasses, A Low Vision Device, Or May Be Referred To A National Hospital. The Brien Holden Vision Initiative Works Within The Seeing Is Believing Program At This Level And At The School Level To Provide Training To Clinical Staff And Teachers, Equipment Needs And The Building Of Systems Between The Ministries Of Health And Education. (Photo By Ashley Gilbertson / VII Photo)Community Children Draw And Play At The Youth Shed On Yalata Community In South Australia, Australia On Oct. 6, 2015. Children Engage In Sport And Recreation Activities Provided At The Youth Centre During School Holidays At The Yalata Community In Remote Western South Australia.  The Safe Eyes, Healthy Lives Program At Yalata Is Being Developed To Enable Active Collaboration Between The Community And The Health Service, The School, The Council, The Youth Centre And Other Relevant Agencies In Order To Address The Key Issues Of Facial Hygiene And Environmental Health In The Context Of Eliminating Trachoma And Other Communicable Disease. Photo By Adam Ferguson For The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust